IHP news 517: AMR

By on April 12, 2019

Science – The challenge of antimicrobial resistance: What economics can contribute

“The accelerating tide of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a major worldwide policy concern. Like climate change, the incentives for individual decision-makers do not take into account the costs to society at large. AMR represents an impending “tragedy of the commons,” and there is an immediate need for collective action to prevent future harm. Roope et al. review the issues associated with AMR from an economics perspective and draw parallels with climate change. A major stumbling block for both challenges is to build consensus about the best way forward when faced with many uncertainties and inequities.” “…Drawing on economic concepts such as externalities and the principal–agent relationship, we suggest how economics can help to solve the challenges arising from increasing resistance to antibiotics. We discuss solutions to the key economic issues, from incentivizing the development of effective new antibiotics to improving antibiotic stewardship through financial mechanisms and regulation.”

A Mysterious Infection, Spanning the Globe in a Climate of Secrecy

The rise of Candida Auris embodies a serious and growing public health threat: drug-resistant germs.

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/04/06/health/drug-resistant-candida-auris.html

“The man at Mount Sinai died after 90 days in the hospital, but C. auris did not. Tests showed it was everywhere in his room, so invasive that the hospital needed special cleaning equipment and had to rip out some of the ceiling and floor tiles to eradicate it.

  1. auris is so tenacious, in part, because it is impervious to major antifungal medications, making it a new example of one of the world’s most intractable health threats: the rise of drug-resistant infections.”

For the ones who want to read more on the germ Candida Auris and drug-resistant infections:

Candida Auris: The Fungus Nobody Wants to Talk About

Culture of Secrecy Shields Hospitals with Outbreaks of Drug-Resistant Infections

 

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